logo

Latest News

Welcome to my blog, which highlights the variety of projects, travel, and more interesting aspects of the life of an itinerant photographer. I’ll be adding images and stories from time to time; do check in!

Photos in the NY Times today

Today’s NY Times (9/2/2016) has a feature article on an exhibition of the designers Alvar and Aino Aalto at the Bard Graduate Center. Several of my images illustrate the article (click on the link below).

Brian Lamb, founder of CSPAN reviews At Home in the Presidents Neighborhood – A Photographic Tour

Bruce White and Bill Seale have produced a book rich with history and compelling photographs that does a superb job chronicling the evolution of one of the most famous neighborhoods in the world. The selected quotes from presidents and first ladies demonstrate how much the occupants of the White House appreciated the specialness of their surroundings, yet still managed to make a home for themselves there.  This beautifully illustrated book will be a special keepsake for Washingtonians and visitors alike–anyone who has a place in their heart for the White House and the dynamic Washington neighborhood that adjoins it.
Brian Lamb, Chairman, C-SPAN

At Home in the President’s Neighborhood – A Photographic Tour

The White House Historical Association published a book of my photographs of the neighborhood of the White House earlier this year (2016). The book has 200 photographs of historic buildings, parks, and the neighborhood itself, with a wonderful  introductory text about each zone written by the inimitable William Seale. It serves as an overview of the White House & its neighborhood, a first in modern times. Later this year, monographs on specific historic houses (Tudor Place, Blair House) will be published by the WHHA, also illustrated with my photographs. The WHHA are producing this series of beautiful books to the highest standards of design and printing; this is true a golden age of publishing on the history of Washington D.C. and the Nation. President’s Neighborhood is out now and available widely.

Mill Street Salon exhibition at Kean University

Kean University hosted more of my personal work in a group exhibition entitled Mill Street Salon: Beyond the Image (I had a one man show there in Spring 2014). The exhibition ran February 13, 2015 May 2015 and showcased the work of nine NJ based photographers.

The Mill St Salon is conducted once a month in a 19th century industrial building in Bernardsville, NJ: Thoughtfully edited and carefully prepared prints are offered for review at each meeting, in an environment of mutual trust and honesty, which facilitates critique and reflection about the work. Extended discussions of equipment, technique and materials are discouraged. Philosophy and ethics of image making are discussed in the context of project based story telling. The group members feel that there are important stories to tell that will enlighten, stimulate, provoke or entertain, using images made in a rigorous manner. A refreshing departure from the selfie culture that most of us are now steeped in.

An Invitation to the Governor’s Mansion

I’ve been asked to take photographs of some very special people from across the State of New Jersey for inclusion in an exhibition at the Governor’s Mansion in Princeton, NJ. Inspire: Everyday People Changing New Jersey, on view at Drumthwacket from September 16, 2015 to July 31, 2016 is curated by the Drumthwacket Foundation in  partnership with New Jersey Heroes, a non-profit organization founded by First Lady Mary Pat Christie, to ‘recognize, celebrate and promote the Heroes of New Jersey who inspire fellow New Jerseyans to give back to their community’.   To learn more about New Jersey Heroes, please visit www.newjerseyheroes.org. Hope you’ll be able to visit the exhibit (and historic house) when the show is open; more info to follow on the opening reception.

Capital Houses Book Launch

Capital Houses: Historic Residences of Washington, D.C. and Its Environs 1735 – 1965 shipped to the publisher in November 2015 and the reception of the book has been really gratifying to see. Thanks to Acanthus Press who did a nice job of producing the book and to all of the property owners who gave me access to photograph this amazing collection of homes.

 

Back in October of 2012 I announced that I was taking new photographs for a comprehensive survey of the most important historic architecture in Washington, D.C. for publication in book form. Including my new photography, as well as a selection of archival images (see dramatic image of the White House being gutted in the 1950′s) my colleague James M. Goode has written the text, including the most up-to-date scholarship on these well known (and not so well known) examples of built artistic expression. We now have an October 2015 publication date and, having seen the beautiful page layouts from Acanthus Press in NYC, are sure that our efforts will be well represented in print. More info as time draws near on availability, book signings, lectures, etc.. (photograph courtesy White House Historical Association).

Exhibition at Kean University

 

Kean University hosted more of my personal work in a group exhibition entitled Mill Street Salon: Beyond the Image (I had a one man show there in Spring 2014). The exhibition ran February 13, 2015 May 2015 and showcased the work of nine NJ based photographers.

 

The Mill St Salon is conducted once a month in a 19th century industrial building in Bernardsville, NJ: Thoughtfully edited and carefully prepared prints are offered for review at each meeting, in an environment of mutual trust and honesty, which facilitates critique and reflection about the work. Extended discussions of equipment, technique and materials are discouraged. Philosophy and ethics of image making are discussed in the context of project based story telling. The group members feel that there are important stories to tell that will enlighten, stimulate, provoke or entertain, using images made in a rigorous manner. A refreshing departure from the selfie culture that most of us are now steeped in.

The Nancy Dryfoos Gallery at Kean University  will be showing a group of my photographs: Cityscapes, Windows & Panoramas from January 21 through February 26, 2014. This solo show will highlight  recent work, taken in cities and villages of Europe and England. A reception will take place January 25 from 3:00 to 5:00 o’clock pm. A price list for works will be available at the gallery or contact bruce@brucewhitephotos.com for more information. Check out the story in Caldwell Patch

Capital Houses: Historic Residences of Washington, D.C. Project

Currently I’m finishing up an exciting project that will be published Fall 2015 by Acanthus Press in New York City: a survey of the most interesting examples of historic residential architecture in Washington, D.C.. The project was conceived by Dr. James Goode, noted Washington, D.C. social and architectural historian, who has published many books on the history of the Nation’s Capitol. In addition to the book project, there will be an exhibition of the photos, and a website. The photographs will reside at  the National Gallery of Art in Washington at the Department of Image Collections, available there to researchers.

 

 

Dr. Goode selected fifty works of residential architecture in Washington, D.C., as well as ten houses in its Maryland and Virginia suburbs. The houses were chosen primarily for their social history and outstanding architectural design. Their architects range from such notable early figures as Benjamin H. Latrobe, William Thornton, and James Hoban, architect of The White House, to more recent internationally known figures, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Philip Johnson, and I.M. Pei.

 

 

Some of the houses selected have remained as private residences, but others are now utilized as clubs, embassies, historic house museums, schools, and even offices. They will be arranged chronologically according to style in eleven chapters from early Georgian all the way to Art Deco and International Style. Examples include Mount Vernon, The White House, Dodge House, Petersen House (the house where Pres. Lincoln died) as well as less well-known houses, such as the Oak Hill Gatehouse, a Victorian building that houses the offices and living quarters of the superintendent of an exclusive, Georgetown cemetery.

 

Stay tuned for the publication and exhibition date!